Articles Posted in Joint Sponsor

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In this segment, we answer 5 of your most frequently asked questions received on our social media platforms and our website. Please remember that every case is different and every immigration journey is unique. You should not compare your situation to anyone else’s. We hope that our answers will provide you with further guidance while you embark on your immigration journey. If you have any further questions, please call our office to schedule a free first time consultation. We serve international clients and domestic clients in all 50 states. We thank you for your continued trust in our law office. For more information on the services we offer please click here.

Fiancé Visa

Q: I am a U.S. Citizen who is planning to marry a Moroccan citizen. I am interested in applying for the K-1 fiancé visa for him. The problem is that we have not met in person and it is hard for me to travel to his country because I am a single parent. I know one of the requirements for this visa is to meet in person. Are there any other visa options available to us since we have not met in person? I have heard of people obtaining waivers due to traveling hardships. Please advise.

A: Thank you for your question. This is a very common fiancé visa question. In order to file the K-1 fiancé visa you must meet the following requirements:

  • You (the petitioner) are a U.S. citizen.
  • You intend to marry within 90 days of your fiancé(e) entering the United States.
  • You and your fiancé(e) are both free to marry and any previous marriages must have been legally terminated by divorce, death, or annulment.
  • You met each other, in person, at least once within 2 years of filing your petition. There are two exceptions that require a waiver:
    If the requirement to meet would violate strict and long-established customs of your or your fiancé(e)’s foreign culture or social practice.

    2. If you prove that the requirement to meet would result in extreme hardship to you.

As indicated above there are only two exceptions that would allow you to seek a waiver of the K-1 visa two-year meeting requirement. The first requires the petitioner to demonstrate that compliance of the two-year meeting requirement would violate strict and long-established customs of either your fiancé’s foreign culture or social practice or of your own foreign culture or social practice. While it is difficult to prove this, it is not impossible, however the couple should be aware that substantial evidence is required to prove that either your or your fiancé’s culture explicitly prohibits you from meeting the two-year requirement. Of course this element is largely at odds with traditional Western norms and practices, therefore it is extremely difficult to explain to an immigration officer why you and your fiancé cannot meet in person before you are to be married.  This waiver should only be considered in very limited circumstances.

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In this blog we are answering 5 of your most frequently asked questions received on our social media platforms and our website. Please remember that every case is different and every immigration journey is unique. You should not compare your situation to anyone else’s. We hope that our answers will provide you with further guidance while you embark on your immigration journey. If you have any further questions, please call our office for a free legal consultation. We serve international clients and domestic clients in all 50 states. We thank you for your continued trust in our law office.

Qualifying for 245i and Adjustment of Status

Q: My ex-husband filed an adjustment of status application on my behalf based on 245i. We separated before we received our initial interview appointment and later divorced. I have since remarried. Can my husband apply for my permanent residence now that we are married?

A: Thank you for your question. Certain individuals who have a qualifying relative willing to file an immigrant visa petition on their behalf, are eligible to adjust their status under 245i Immigration and Nationality Act if they entered the country without inspection (unlawfully) and were the beneficiary of a visa petition or application for labor certification filed on specific dates outline below. Before proceeding with a new green card application, you should make sure you qualify for 245i and have all of the necessary documents to prove your eligibility. 245i applicants must provide documented evidence of their physical presence in the United States and evidence that the visa petition or application for labor certification was filed on their behalf by providing the receipt notice of the petition also known as the I-797 Notice of Action.

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By Lupe Lopez

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Richard and Micaelina met when they both first started attending school at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).  It was easy to see why Richard had fallen in love with Micaelina, an articulate and funny Italian beauty.  After two years of dating they decided to get married and begin the immigration process for Micaelina.  They had everything in order except one little thing; well, maybe not so little.  Being a full time student, Richard did not earn enough money to fulfill the requirements for the Affidavit of Support.  They would need a joint sponsor; that is, a person with enough annual earnings or assets to qualify for the affidavit.

Richard had not thought of this.  Both he and Micaelina had depended upon student loans and their parents for most of their expenses.  Although Micaelina’s parents were well off and could continue to help the young couple, they were foreigners with no legal status in the U.S. thus disqualifying them as joint sponsors.  Richard’s parents are hard-working middle class people with other children they need to support.  They are not poor, but because they already claim several dependents, they, too, did not qualify.  Most of Richard and Micaelina’s friends were students just like them and they did not earn sufficient money to help the young couple.  After many months of searching for a suitable sponsor and one who was willing to sign the Affidavit of Support contract between the sponsor and the U.S. government, Richard and Micaelina finally found a person willing to help them.

Richard and Micaelina are not alone.  In our constantly busy office, there is not a single week that goes by where we do not run into this same problem.  When the Petitioner, in this case Richard, does not earn enough or have enough assets to fulfill the requirements for the Affidavit of Support it can be more difficult than expected to find a joint sponsor.

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